ADINA Publications

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The Theory used in ADINA is richly documented in the following books by K.J. Bathe and co-authors


Finite Element Procedures
 

Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis

Numerical Methods in Finite Element Analysis
 


The Mechanics of Solids and Structures — Hierarchical ...


The Finite Element Analysis of Shells — Fundamentals


Inelastic Analysis of Solids and Structures

 
 
To Enrich Life
(Sample pages here)
 

 

Following are more than 700 publications — that we know of — with reference to the use of ADINA. The pages give the Abstracts of some papers published since 1986 referring to ADINA. The most recent papers are listed first. All these papers may be searched using the box:

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User-supplied concrete material model for ADINA

Saadeghvaziri, M. Ala (NJIT) Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 591-600

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: ADINA's capability in providing the user with the option to construct his/her own material model is employed to add a simple concrete material model. The simplicity of the model arises from the assumption of a uniaxial state of stress and it can be used for nonlinear analysis of members under primarily flexural and/or axial load. The effectiveness of the model under monotonic, as well as cyclic loading, is shown through analyses of three test problems. (10 refs.)

Keywords:  Reinforced concrete  -  Stresses  -  Loads (forces)  -  Structural analysis  -  Mathematical models  -  Nonlinear equations  -  Finite element method  -  Computational methods  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Concrete material models  -  Flexural loads  -  Axial loads  -  Software package ADINA

 

Damage Analysis With Adina Of Naval Panels Subjected To A Confined Air-Blast Wave

R. Houlston and J. Slater

Defence Research Establishment, Suffield, Medicine Hat, Canada

Computers and Structures, 47(415):629-639, 1993

Abstract: The interaction of air-blast waves with naval warships can result in significantly greater structural damage than predicted from the free-field blast wave characteristics. Under certain conditions, the superposition of multiple reflections produces a pressure-frequency spectrum that can critically damage important structural components. For detailed analysis of air-blast wave-structure interaction, the analyst must have computational tools to calculate both the complex hydrodynamic structural loading from air-blast wave-structure interaction and also the associated structural response. This paper describes the method used to couple the ADINA nonlinear dynamic structural response code with a hydrodynamic air-blast loading code. Two representative examples are presented for structural response and damage analysis of naval panels situated in a reentrant corner confinement.

Keywords: Acoustic waves — Computational methods — Computer software — Dynamic response — Finite element method — Mathematical models — Structural analysis — Warships — Wave effects

 

 

Large-scale slope movements and their affect on spoil-ple stability in Interior Alaska

R.C. Speck, S.L. Huang and E.B. Kroeger

Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-1190, USA

International Journal of Surface Mining and Reclamation, 7:161-166, 1993.

Abstract: A coal mine in Interior Alaska has had an ongoing problem with spoil pile instability. Pre-mining slope failures, which had come to equilibrium, were reactivated by placement of spoil onto the failed ground. Finite element and limit equilibrium analyses indicate that deep-seated sliding along an underclay, slip along the interface between the spoil and subspoil ground and near-surface slump may be all occuring simultaneously as ground water migrates through these areas.

 

 

Effect Of Vertical Contraction Joints In Concrete Arch Dams

J.R. Mays1 and L.H. Roehm2

1 Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO., U.S.A.
2 U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, P.O. Box 25007, Denver, CO80225, U.S.A.

Computers and Structures, 47(4-5):615-627, 1993

Abstract: The vertical joints between the blocks of concrete in arch dams allow for contraction as the concrete cools during construction. Linear analyses, which ignore the presence of these joints, indicate large horizontal tensile stresses near the joints particularly when seismic loading is included. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is studying the nonlinear behavior of these vertical joints by making comparisons between parallel linear and nonlinear analyses of East Canyon Dam. This paper reports on the use of ADINA's gap element to model the contraction joints. The nonlinear analysis shows decreased values of the horizontal tensile stress at the expense of larger compressive stresses and increasing values of vertical tensile stress.

Keywords: Computational methods — Computer software — Concrete dams — Finite element method — Joints (structural components) — Loads (forces) — Mathematical models — Nonlinear equations — Seismic waves — Shrinkage — Stresses

 

 

Effect of vertical contraction joints in concrete arch dams

Mays, J.R. (Univ of Colorado at Denver); Roehm, L.H. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 615-627

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The vertical joints between the blocks of concrete in arch dams allow for contraction as the concrete cools during construction. Linear analyses, which ignore the presence of these joints, indicate large horizontal tensile stresses near the joints particularly when seismic loading is included. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is studying the nonlinear behavior of these vertical joints by making comparisons between parallel linear and nonlinear analyses of East Canyon Dam. This paper reports on the use of ADINA's gap element to model the contraction joints. The nonlinear analysis shows decreased values of the horizontal tensile stress at the expense of larger compressive stresses and increasing values of vertical tensile stress. (7 refs.)

Keywords:  Arch dams  -  Concrete dams  -  Joints (structural components)  -  Shrinkage  -  Stresses  -  Seismic waves  -  Loads (forces)  -  Mathematical models  -  Nonlinear equations  -  Finite element method  -  Computational methods  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Vertical contraction joints  -  Seismic loading  -  Tensile stresses  -  Software package ADINA  -  Gap elements


Damage analysis with ADINA of naval panels subjected to a confined air-blast wave

Houlston, R. (Defence Research Establishment Suffield); Slater, J.E. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 629-639

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The interaction of air-blast waves with naval warships can result in significantly greater structural damage than predicted from the free-field blast wave characteristics. Under certain conditions, the superposition of multiple reflections produces a pressure-frequency spectrum that can critically damage important structural components. For detailed analysis of air-blast wave-structure interaction, the analyst must have computational tools to calculate both the complex hydrodynamic structural loading from air-blast wave-structure interaction and also the associated structural response. This paper describes the method used to couple the ADINA nonlinear dynamic structural response code with a hydrodynamic air-blast loading code. Two representative examples are presented for structural response and damage analysis of naval panels situated in a reentrant corner confinement. (6 refs.)

Keywords:  Structural panels  -  Warships  -  Wave effects  -  Acoustic waves  -  Dynamic response  -  Structural analysis  -  Mathematical models  -  Finite element method  -  Computational methods  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Confined air blast waves  -  Structural damage  -  Multiple reflections  -  Pressure frequency spectrum  -  Wave structure interactions  -  Reentrant corner confinement  -  Software package ADINA

 


Analysis of frame-cable structures

Shan, W. (Taiyo Kogyo Corp); Yamamoto, C.; Oda, K. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 673-682

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: An approach for the analysis of frame-cable structures which are prestressed cable nets incorporating space frames is presented. The interaction between the frame members and the cables is considered and the application of ADINA in shape finding and loading analysis is discussed. A technique is described for integrated loading analysis of frame-cable structures containing beam elements. The numerical examples demonstrate the practical importance of accounting for the effects of the frame deformations. (11 refs.)

Keywords:  Structural analysis  -  Cables  -  Structural frames  -  Beams and girders  -  Deformation  -  Prestressing  -  Loads (forces)  -  Mathematical models  -  Finite element method  -  Computational methods  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Frame cable structures  -  Prestressed cable nets  -  Loading analysis  -  Shape finding  -  Software package ADINA

 


Strength of double hull ship cellular components under axial and lateral loads

Pang, Alan Ah-Kum (Lehigh Univ); Ricles, James, M.; Lu, Le-Wu; Dexter, Robert, J.; Beach, Jeffrey, E. Source: Proceedings of the Third (1993) International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference, 1993, p 62-65

ISBN-10: 1-880653-06-0

Conference: Proceedings of the Third (1993) International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference, Part 1 (of 4), Jun 6-11 1993, Singapore, Singapore Sponsor: Int Soc of Offshore & Polar Engineers (ISOPE); Offshore Mechanics & Polar Engineering Council (OMPEC)

Publisher: Publ by Int Soc of Offshore and Polar Engineerns (ISOPE)

Abstract: An analytical and experimental program was conducted to study the instability failure modes of double hull box cells fabricated from high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel. Altogether seven full scale specimens cut from a double hull prototype structure and two separately fabricated half scale specimens were tested. Loss of stiffness and significant transverse deflections of the component plates were observed to occur near the theoretical elastic buckling stress, and the failure mode of the column and beam column specimens was flexural instability with locally buckled sections. Finite element analysis of the test specimens was performed using the program ADINA. The results showed reasonable agreement with the experimental values. Cell interaction effects in multicellular specimens did not affect the strengths significantly and the ultimate strengths of the box columns and beam-columns could be predicted by simple tangent modulus and interaction equation methods.

Keywords:  Hulls (ship)  -  Structural loads  -  Deflection (structures)  -  Buckling  -  Columns (structural)  -  Finite element method

Secondary Keywords:  Double hull box cells  -  Axial loads  -  Lateral loads  -  Collapse  -  Instability failure modes  -  Elastic buckling stress


Strength of tubular members containing holes

Hsu, T.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co) Source: Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE, Materials Engineering, 1993, p 587-596

CODEN: PIOSEB ISBN-10: 0-7918-0785-1

Conference: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Offshore Mechanical and Arctic Engineering (OMAE 1993), Jun 20-24 1993, Glasgow, Scotland, Engl Sponsor: ASME, USA; TWI, UK; CSME, Can; NSCE, Norw; Institution of Mechanical Engineers, UK; et al

Publisher: ASME

Abstract: A small-scale, compressive-load test program was conducted at Chevron to determine the strength of tubular members with 1 to 3 holes. The parameters evaluated include the hole size, hole shape, hole location, and number of holes. Results from these tests provide a basis for platform ultimate strength calculations that are needed in making decisions on platform repairs. More than 50 specimens were tested in air under displacement control. Test specimen lengths were limited by the test apparatus to 45 in (1,143 mm). Tubulars used in the test had an outside diameter of 3.5 in (89 mm), which gave member slenderness ratios of about 40. The tests were needed because of the lack of relevant compression tests on members with holes. Based on test results, there appears to be a limiting value of hole size below which the compression-load capacity of the member is practically not affected by the existence of the hole. For example, a hole that is 10% of the member diameter does not significantly reduce member strength. This means remedial treatment is not necessary for many small holes, when ultimate strength is the controlling consideration. Nonlinear finite element shell analyses using both ADINA and FACTS computer programs and a simplified analysis using DENTA-II PC program were performed and results compared with data. We found that nonlinear finite element programs provide good predictions of capacities of members with holes, and that a simplified DENTA-II program provides adequate and efficient predictions. (19 refs.)

Keywords:  Tubes (components)  -  Strength of materials  -  Loads (forces)  -  Structural design  -  Finite element method  -  Computer software  -  Compression testing

Secondary Keywords:  Tubular members  -  Hole  -  Nonlinear finite element shell analysis

 


Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA

Bathe, K.J., ed. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 511-891

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Publisher: Publ by Pergamon Press Inc

Abstract: The Conference materials contain 27 papers dealing with recent advances for practical finite element analysis. Well-formulated mixed finite element formulations are employed for the analysis of almost incompressible elastic media, elastoplasticity and creep, plates and shells, and fluid dynamics. All papers are abstracted and indexed separately.

Keywords:  Finite element method  -  Structural analysis  -  Computer aided analysis  -  Computer simulation  -  Fracture mechanics  -  Sensitivity analysis  -  Crack propagation  -  Computer aided design  -  Shells (structures)  -  Bridges  -  Dams  -  Dynamic response  -  Elasticity

Secondary  Keywords:  Nonlinear finite element analysis  -  ADINA system  -  Automatic Dynamic Incremental Nonlinear Analysis  -  Reinforced concrete bridges  -  Welding-induced residual stresses  -  Flexible manipulators  -  Viscous incompressible flows  -  Viscoelastic bodies  -  Pendulum impact loads  -  EIREV

 


Dynamic response of dolos armor units to pendulum impact loads

Rosson, B.T. (Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln); Tedesco, J.W. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 641-652

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Design methods for concrete armor units have come under scrutiny because of several recent breakwater failures. The catastrophic failure of the Sines breakwater in Portugal and other less spectacular failures such as the one at Cresent City, California have kindled doubts as to the structural integrity of the large dolos concrete armor unit. A major difficulty encountered in rationally designing dolosse (or any other armor unit) is the specification of the loads. The complexity of the in situ loading conditions preclude an exact solution. Therefore, the pendulum test was developed to simulate the impact of broken units that are thrown around by the waves. This paper summarizes the results of a comprehensive numerical analysis to determine the states of stress in dolosse, with varying dimensions and concrete properties, subject to pendulum impact loads. A three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) analysis of pendulum impact tests was conducted through implementation of the ADINA finite element computer programs. The results of the FEM analyses are used to develop an analytical procedure which accurately predicts the peak tensile stresses in the shank and fluke of dolosse subject to pendulum impacts. (21 refs.)

Keywords:  Breakwaters  -  Armor  -  Concretes  -  Failure (mechanical)  -  Structural analysis  -  Dynamic response  -  Loads (forces)  -  Pendulums  -  Stresses  -  Impact testing  -  Water wave effects  -  Finite element method  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Dolos concrete armor units  -  Pendulum impact loads  -  Tensile stresses  -  Shanks  -  Flukes  -  Software package ADINA

 


Numerical analysis of high strain rate splitting-tensile tests

Hughes, M.L. (Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency); Tedesco, J.W.; Ross, C.A. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 653-671

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Experimental splitting-tension tests were conducted on 2-in. diameter concrete specimens in a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at strain rates of 4.4, 10.6, and 14.7/sec. The specimens were instrumented with electrical resistance strain gages and break circuits to detect crack initiation and growth. Experimental results indicate that there is a shift of crack initiation time relative to the peak stress. Also, experimental strength vs strain rate data reveal that the dynamic tensile strength of concrete is significantly higher than the static tensile strength. A comprehensive numerical analysis was conducted on the splitting-tensile experiments to investigate the effects of varying the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete on the crack initiation time, stress state, crack growth characteristics, and failure mode in the concrete specimens. The results of the numerical analyses are used to enhance the understanding of concrete tensile strength strain rate sensitivity. (29 refs.)

Keywords:  Concrete construction  -  Shelters (from attack)  -  Tensile testing  -  Stresses  -  Strain  -  Cracks  -  Crack propagation  -  Strength of materials  -  Failure (mechanical)  -  Fracture mechanics  -  Mathematical models  -  Finite element method  -  Strain gages

Secondary  Keywords:  Splitting tensile tests  -  Strain rates  -  Crack initiation  -  Tensile strength  -  Split Hopkinson pressure bar  -  Electric resistance strain gages  -  Break circuits

 


Dynamic analysis of structures using object-oriented techniques

Pidaparti, R. M. V. (Purdue Univ); Hudli, A. V. Source: Computers and Structures, v 49, n 1, Oct 3, 1993, p 149-156

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Abstract: This paper presents an object-oriented analysis of finite element methods for dynamic analysis with a view to increasing the efficiency, robustness and state-of-the-art functional relation, in the context of a CAD system for engineering design. This approach offers potential benefits of accessing the programs to tailor one's particular needs and the addition of software to the existing general-purpose finite element programs. The objects are identified for dynamic analysis and a pseudocode is presented to illustrate the feasibility of this approach. This approach with knowledge-base rules offers great benefits for solving engineering design problems. (12 refs.)

Keywords:  Structural analysis  -  Dynamic response  -  Computer aided design  -  Computer software  -  Finite element method

Secondary  Keywords:  Structure dynamic analysis  -  Object-oriented techniques  -  Knowledge-base rules  -  General-purpose finite element programs  -  Software package ABAQUS  -  Software package NASTRAN  -  Software package ADINA

 


Nonlinear seismic response of antenna-supporting structures

Guevara, E. (McGill Univ); McClure, G. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 711-724

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: In the event of a severe seismic excitation, preservation of essential infrastructures, such as telecommunication facilities, is of high priority. The objective of this paper is to investigate the geometrically nonlinear response of antenna-supporting guyed towers under earthquake loading. Two guyed towers are analyzed: a 350 ft (107 m) tower with six stay levels and an 80 ft (24 m) mast with only two stay levels. Two horizontal accelerograms are used, El Centro and Parkfield, with each record being scaled to match the elastic design spectra of the 1990 National Building Code of Canada. Elements of response analyzed are: guy tensions, horizontal shears, and displacements and rotations at the tip of the mast. Results indicate that although the absolute values of the dynamic amplifications are well below the limit strength and serviceability criteria for such towers, dynamic interactions between the guywires and the mast are important, especially in the vertical direction. Multiple support excitation of the tallest tower also causes additional dynamic effects that are not present when only synchronous ground motion is studied. (15 refs.)

Keywords:  Earthquake resistance  -  Antennas  -  Supports  -  Towers  -  Structural analysis  -  Dynamic response  -  Deformation  -  Shear stress  -  Service life  -  Strength of materials  -  Mathematical models  -  Nonlinear equations  -  Finite element method

Secondary  Keywords:  Antenna supporting guyed towers  -  Seismic excitations  -  Stay levels  -  Elastic design spectra


Model reduction methods for dynamic analyses of large structures

Haggblad, B. (Royal Inst of Technology); Eriksson, L. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 735-749

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: User-friendly finite element pre-processors permit detailed modelling of engineering structures with complicated topologies, often resulting in a much larger number of degrees of freedom than that motivated by the expected complexity of the structural response. Dynamic analyses of these large-scale models might require a prohibitive amount of CPU time. In particular, the uncoupling of the equations of motion for linear systems with non-proportional damping by means of a complex eigenvector basis is computationally very demanding. We present general model reduction procedures, applicable to whole structures or substructures, that produce a series of reduced models each spanning appropriate subspaces (general Krylov spaces) of the solution space. Crucial steps in such procedures are the selection of basis vectors for the (sub)structures and the control of reduction errors. The set of basis vectors is generated by using a simple physical approach for successively reducing the residual error in the governing equilibrium equations. A frequency window method (shifting) is used to capture the relevant frequency content. The residuals of the equilibrium equations, computed on fully expanded level, are used as reliable measures of the reduction errors. The efficiency of the techniques is demonstrated in some numerical experiments and on a large engineering problem, using a program based on SAP IV. (36 refs.)

Keywords:  Structural analysis  -  Large scale systems  -  Dynamic response  -  Damping  -  Equations of motion  -  Mathematical models  -  Finite element method  -  Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions  -  Error analysis  -  Vectors  -  Computer software  -  Program processors  -  Computational methods

Secondary Keywords:  Finite element preprocessors  -  General Krylov spaces  -  Model reduction  -  Equilibrium equations  -  Frequency window method  -  Software package SAP IV

 


Optimal control of a flexible manipulator

Szyszkowski, W. (Univ of Saskatchewan); Youck, D. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 801-813

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Manipulators handling payload masses several times larger than their own weight are considered. The optimal control rule, based on rigid body dynamics, is used to minimize the time of a slewing maneuver of a single link. The performance of such control is simulated using ADINA. The influence of various flexibility parameters on the performance of the optimal control is discussed. (13 refs.)

Keywords:  Manipulators  -  Flexible structures  -  Motion control  -  Optimal control systems  -  Finite element method  -  Mathematical models  -  Computer simulation  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Flexible manipulators  -  Rigid body dynamics  -  Slewing maneuvers  -  Software package ADINA

 


Adaptive finite element analysis of large strain elastic response

Kato, K. (Massachusetts Inst of Technology); Lee, N.S.; Bathe, K.J. Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 829-855

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Some basic studies and developments for adaptive procedures in large strain finite element analysis are presented: an evaluation of higher-order elements, two pointwise indicators for errors in stresses, a mesh generator for remeshing on the deformed configuration of the body, and a general mapping scheme for transferring solution variables across models. The methods discussed constitute the ingredients of a proposed adaptive process that is demonstrated in solutions of two-dimensional stress analyses of rubber-like materials including contact conditions. (41 refs.)

Keywords:  Elasticity  -  Dynamic response  -  Stresses  -  Strain  -  Deformation  -  Mathematical models  -  Finite element method  -  Mathematical transformations  -  Adaptive systems  -  Error analysis

Secondary Keywords:  Adaptive finite element analysis  -  Mesh generators  -  Mapping schemes  -  Rubber like materials

 


Fracture mechanical analysis of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock loading

Reimers, P. (IWiS GmbH Berlin) Source: Computers and Structures, v 47, n 4-5, Jun 3, 1993, Nonlinear Finite Element and ADINA, p 815-827

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 9th ADINA Conference, Jun 23-25 1993, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Improved knowledge of cooling conditions in nuclear power plants in the case of potential emergencies and increasing irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials are two reasons for the fact that the safety of plant components is under permanent observation. In a loss-of-coolant accident it is possible that the injected cooling water runs in stripes down the vessel wall. This causes high thermal stresses and high stress gradients in the wall combined with a decrease of fracture toughness of the ferritic material. Assuming a circumferential crack in this region the temperature and loadtime-dependent stress intensity factors along the crack front are to be determined and compared with the temperature and life-time-dependent material toughness for the evaluation of pressure vessel safety against unstable crack propagation. Considering a reactor pressure vessel in operation the necessary ADINA finite element analyses of (i) transient heat transfer through the wall of the vessel and (ii) the stress and strain fields for thermoelastic-plastic material behaviour are presented. The virtual crack extension method was used for the calculation of J-integral values along the crackfront, which were converted into the stress intensity factors being compared with the material toughness. (7 refs.)

Keywords:  Pressure vessels  -  Ferrite  -  Nuclear reactors  -  Loss of coolant accidents  -  Cooling water  -  Wall flow  -  Heat transfer  -  Thermal stress  -  Crack propagation  -  Fracture mechanics  -  Finite element method  -  Integral equations  -  Computer software

Secondary  Keywords:  Reactor pressure vessels  -  Thermal shock loading  -  Fracture toughness  -  Circumferential cracks  -  Stress intensity factors  -  Thermoelastic plastic materials  -  Virtual crack extension method  -  Crackfronts  -  J intergals  -  Software package ADINA

 



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