ADINA Publications

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The Theory used in ADINA is richly documented in the following books by K.J. Bathe and co-authors


Finite Element Procedures
 

Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis

Numerical Methods in Finite Element Analysis
 


The Mechanics of Solids and Structures — Hierarchical ...


The Finite Element Analysis of Shells — Fundamentals


Inelastic Analysis of Solids and Structures

 
 
To Enrich Life
(Sample pages here)
 

 

Following are more than 700 publications — that we know of — with reference to the use of ADINA. The pages give the Abstracts of some papers published since 1986 referring to ADINA. The most recent papers are listed first. All these papers may be searched using the box:

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Finite element stress tensor fields interpolation and manipulation using 3D dual kriging

Poirier, C. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal); Tinawi, R. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 211-222

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Three-dimensional dual kriging theory, commonly applied in geostatistics, is used in a novel way for the interpolation and manipulation of 3D stress tensor fields. The application of this technique provides a designer with a way of visualizing the results and an appreciation of the errors in the finite element model. Applications of this technique are described using simple as well as complex structures.

Keywords:  Mathematical Techniques -- Finite Element Method  -  Stresses--Computer Aided Analysis  -  Engineering--Computer Aided Design  -  Mines and Mining  -  Petroleum Engineering  -  Maps and Mapping

Secondary  Keywords:  Hydrology  -  Hydraulics  -  Stress Tensor Fields Interpolation  -  Kriging  -  Three-dimensional Dual Kriging  -  Geostatistics

 

Material parameters periodontal ligament and stress profiles within the periodontal ligament

K.L. Andersen, E.H. Pedersen, and B. Melsen

Royal Dental College of Aarhus, Denmark

Am J Orthod Dentofac Orthop;99:427-40, 1991

Abstract:  Levels and profiles of initial stress in the periodontal ligament after application of various force systems were studied. Two finite-element models, based on sections of human autopsy material, were developed to simulate one full and one partial mandible. The validity of the finite-element model was improved by identiiication of material parameters; the mechanical properties of the tissue were described by means of strain-gauge measurements of initial tooth movements in human autopsy material. The multiple modeling technique, in which data from a coarse global model are transferred to a more detailed one, was used to identify bone structure and boundary conditions. Parameters known to influence the results were varied to establish the validity of the finite-element model. Iterative calculation methods were used to gain stable results. However, optimizing features of the bone ,structure and boundary conditions did not influence the results significantly. The elastic stiffness of the periodontal ligament was determined to 0.07 MPa and τ = 0.49 (τ  being the Poisson's ratio). Stress profiles were obtained for various force systems--as in tipping, translation, and root movement. As we expected, there was a marked variation in the stress distribution from cervix to apex when tipping forces were applied. Bodily movement of the tooth produced an almost uniform stress distribution; root movement produced stress patterns opposite to those observed during tipping; and masticatory forces alone produced stress patterns almost identical to those achieved by masticatory force in combination with orthodontic forces.


Finite element method on vector processors

Weber, P. (Univ of Karlsruhe); Gross, L.; Knocke, A.; Sternecker, P.; Brandel, B.; Schoenauer, W. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 223-235

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The finite element analysis of large problems relies on the efficient use of supercomputers. Vectorization and parallelization therefore is an important issue in the future development of finite element programs. We report on the vectorization of ADINA [ADINA Manuals, ADINA R&D Inc.] for the Siemens/Fujitsu vector processors of the VP and VP-EX series. Due to the data structure of ADINA the observed performance gains are mainly from the solution phase of ADINA. Highly optimized finite element code on vector processors has to take into account the specific hardware capabilities. We discuss the data structure of the finite element kernel program VECFEM, which is tailored for the architecture of vector processors. Performance data of the original and the adapted ADINA and of the VECFEM program are presented.

Keywords:  Mathematical Techniques -- Finite Element Method  -  Computer Aided Analysis  -  Computer Programming  -  Computers, Supercomputer  -  Computer Software

Secondary  Keywords:  Vectorization  -  Parallelization  -  Vector Processors  -  ADINA (Automatic Dynamic Incremental Nonlinear Analysis)  -  Finite Element Kernel Program VECFEM

 


Significance of mesh-fineness in accuracy of finite element analysis of hyperbolic cooling tower shells

Chowdhury, A. (Lehigh Univ); Kostem, C.N. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 237-241

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Increased dependence on finite element modelling of structures in practice has made awareness of error potential of these analyses essential. This concern is even more pertinent in case of shell structures, since finite element analysis results of these structures is more error-prone. In reported research, the effect of mesh-fineness of finite element models on accuracy of finite element analysis solutions is investigated for hyperbolic cooling tower shells. The sensitivity of the errors to geometry of the shell is also examined. Elastic material model and static gravity loading is used. The study findings indicate that under symmetric state of stress, inadequate mesh-fineness may cause significant error in the shell force estimate from finite element analysis. The accuracy of longitudinal shell force estimate is fairly insensitive to the geometry of the shell. However, even small changes in the shape may drastically affect the accuracy of meridional shell force estimates.

Keywords:  Cooling Towers -- Structural Analysis  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Computer Aided Analysis  -  Mathematical Models  -  Elasticity  -  Gravitation

Secondary  Keywords:  Mesh Fineness  -  Hyperbolic Cooling Tower Shells

 


Numerical simulation of dolos drop tests

Tedesco, J.W. (Auburn Univ); Rosson, B.T.; McDougal, W.G. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 243-255

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: A three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) analysis is conducted to simulate dolos drop tests. The FEM analysis employs a nonlinear concrete material model and utilizes a contact surface at the base of the vertical fluke. The results of the analysis predict the dynamic states of stress in the dolos and the pattern of cracking in the unit.

Keywords:  Hydraulic Structures -- Computer Simulation  -  Concrete Construction  -  Concrete Products  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Stresses--Analysis  -  Computer Simulation

Secondary  Keywords:  Dolos Drop Tests  -  Numerical Simulation  -  Nonlinear Concrete Material Model  -  Crack Propagation  -  Vertical Flukes  -  Rigid Body Rotation

 


Comparison of computer codes for seismic analysis of dams

Singhal, A.C. (Arizona State Univ) Source: Computers and Structures, v 38, n 1, 1991, p 107-112

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Abstract: An extensive set of computer studies has been made using the EAGD, SAP IV, and ADINA computer codes. Dam-reservoir interaction has been incorporated by two different methods: fluid element and discretized lumped water mass. Parametric studies have been made to investigate the effect of (a) water compressibility vs incompressibility, (b) flexible vs rigid foundation, (c) empty vs full reservoir, and (d) numerical technique on central processor execution time. It has been found that the alpha factor (reservoir absorption coefficient) used in the EAGD program has an influence on the individual modal response of the dam. However, the overall deflections and stresses are not very sensitive to the variation in the value of this alpha parameter. The deflections and stresses obtained from EAGD, which uses finite element simulation for the water reservoir, are compared with SAP IV and ADINA results with discretized lumped water masses. Seismic behavior of the Pine Flat Dam subjected to the Taft earthquake shows that the results of the compressible water model are almost the same as those of the incompressible water model. Lumped added water mass results are about twice as large as results obtained using the fluid element model. A summary of computer execution time is also provided for comparison of relative merits of various numerical techniques. It is noted that EAGD uses a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm whereas SAP IV and ADINA use time domain methods. Execution time for ADINA is three times longer than that for the SAP IV program. (17 refs.)

Keywords:  Dams -- Earthquake Resistance  -  Earthquake Resistance--Computer Aided Analysis  -  Computer Software--Evaluation  -  Hydrodynamics--Fluid Structure Interaction  -  Foundations  -  Mathematical Techniques--Numerical Methods

Secondary  Keywords:  Software Package EAGD  -  Software Package SAP IV  -  Software Package ADINA

 

Investigation of the thermomechanical response of a titanium aluminide/silicon carbide composite using a unified state variable model in ADINA

Sherwood, J.A. (Univ of New Hampshire); Boyle, M.J. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 257-269

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The stress response of a titanium aluminide/silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite has been studied. The investigation was conducted using a two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model of a unit cell of the composite. The model was generated with the ADINA-IN finite element program preprocessor. A strain-rate dependent unified state variable constitutive model was implemented into the ADINA finite element program to analyze the materials time-dependent inelastic response. The composite system was subjected to various time-dependent cooling profiles in an effort to reduce the residual stresses that initiate radial cracks in the matrix. The cracks originate at the fiber-matrix interface as the material is cooled from its consolidation temperature to room temperature.

Keywords:  Composite Materials -- Stresses  -  Fracture Mechanics  -  Computer Simulation  -  Stresses--Thermal  -  Silicon Carbide  -  Mathematical Models

Secondary Keywords:  Titanium Aluminide  -  Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites  -  ADINA-IN Finite Element Program Preprocessor  -  ADINA Finite Element Program  -  Cooling  -  Residual Stresses

 


Quality assurance for fracture mechanical finite element analyses

Mikkola, T.P.J. (Technical Research Cent of Finland); Niemi, H. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 271-279

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: A program system for automated fracture mechanical analyses with three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models has been developed. The main application has been safety analyses of pressurized components of nuclear power stations such as pipes and pipe bends containing surface cracks. The system is being extended to surface cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle area. A large matrix of varying surface crack sizes in a plate under tension has been analysed and the automatically generated mesh is shown to give good accuracy. Such tests cannot guarantee the same accuracy for general loading conditions and geometries. Methods are being developed for the accuracy assessment of the results and for directing the mesh refinement. Results of a test series with plane models are promising. In the mesh refinement element sub-division was used. The same accuracy assessment approach is applied also to 3D models.

Keywords:  Fracture Mechanics -- Computer Aided Analysis  -  Plates--Cracks  -  Mathematical Models  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Nuclear Power Plants--Pressure Vessels  -  Piping Systems

Secondary  Keywords:  Automated Fracture Mechanical Finite Element Analysis  -  Safety Analyses  -  Pressurized Components  -  Pipes  -  Nozzles  -  Reactor Pressure Vessels

 


Hydrodynamic pressure in a dam-reservoir system

Mays, J.R. (Univ of Colorado); Roehm, L.H. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 281-291

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: A comparison of three approaches to the solution of the dam-reservoir interaction problem is presented. A 400-ft high concrete gravity dam, its reservoir and the rigid foundation are subjected to seismic ground motion. The computer programs ADINA-5 and EAGD-84 produced analyses which compared closely. Westergaard's added mass theory in general produced conservative results for both horizontal ground motion and the combined horizontal and vertical ground motion. Westergaard's theory produced results which were not comparable for the vertical only ground motion.

Keywords:  Dams, Gravity -- Computer Aided Analysis  -  Reservoirs  -  Seismic Waves  -  Earthquakes  -  Computer Programming  -  Dams, Concrete

Secondary Keywords:  Concrete Gravity dams  -  Software Package ADINA-5  -  Software Package EAGD-84  -  Westergaard's Added Mass Theory  -  Ground Motion

 


Thermo-elastic-creep analysis of maturing concrete

Carlton, D. (Taylor Woodrow Construction); Mistry, N. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 293-302

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The ADINA program has a creep material model based on strain hardening and effective stress approach. Taylor Woodrow had the opportunity to investigate aspects of concrete behaviour associated with creep and shrinkage particularly in early age concrete. The study has led to modifications to the creep model to address following aspects; linear dependency of stress, age and temperature dependency of properties, creep flow, delayed elasticity and transitional thermal creep. The proposed creep model is mainly based on CEB-FIP 1978 recommendations. The paper highlights the mechanism of creep in concrete and proposes the procedure to implement in the code. Comparisons with published work are presented.

Keywords:  Concrete -- Creep  -  Computer Aided Analysis  -  Computer programming  -  Mathematical Models  -  Stresses  -  Thermoelasticity

Secondary Keywords:  Software Package ADINA  -  Strain hardening  -  Creep Material Models  -  Shrinkage

 


Heat resistant concrete for airfield pavements. Preliminary numerical study

Malvar, L.J. (Univ of California); Hironaka, M.C. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 303-311

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Concrete airfield pavements subjected to the exhaust gas of the F/A-18 aircraft auxiliary power unit experience cracking and spalling. A two-step finite element simulation of the airfield pavement yields the temperature distribution and the consequent stress field. It is shown that normal weight concrete pavements will deteriorate. A parameter study is then carried out to assess the influence of each concrete property on the thermal stress field. From this study, the adequacy of any type of concrete can be determined. In particular, the properties of all-lightweight structural concrete are considered. It is shown that all-lightweight structural concrete may provide a satisfactory solution, even when the pavement is initially frozen.

Keywords:  Concrete -- Heat resisting  -  Aircraft Engines--Exhaust Gases  -  Airports  -  Pavements  -  Concrete Construction  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method

Secondary  Keywords:  Airfield Pavements  -  Cracking  -  Spalling

 


Numerical analysis of high strain rate concrete direct tension tests

Tedesco, J.W. (Auburn Univ); Ross, C.A.; McGill, P.B.; O'Neil, B.P. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 313-327

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: Direct tension tests of plain concrete specimens were conducted on a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to investigate the effects of increasing strain rate on the tensile strength of concrete. A comprehensive finite element method (FEM) study was performed on the SHPB experiments. Both linear and nonlinear analyses were conducted. The results of the numerical analyses disclose the dynamic states of stress in the specimen prior to failure as well as the mode of failure.

Keywords:  Concrete Testing -- Tensile Tests  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Bars--Concrete  -  Stresses  -  Failure Analysis  -  Strain

Secondary  Keywords:  Numerical Analysis  -  Direct tension Tests  -  Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars

 


Calculation of shafts in deposits with regard to inperfections, buckling and visco-elastic material properties

Hock, K. (Bergische Univ-GH Wuppertal); Langlie, C. Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 329-337

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: A typical application of the finite element method in civil engineering is presented. The response of a high-density polyethylene-deposit shaft, modelled by 200 shell elements, to the special influences due to its positioning within the refuse body is investigated. It is shown that the finite element method is a proper instrument to evaluate the particular relevance of single influences.

Keywords:  Structural Design -- Computer Aided Design  -  Waste Disposal  -  Refuse Disposal  -  Polyethylenes--High Density  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Civil Engineering--Computer Applications

Secondary  Keywords:  Deposit Shafts  -  Shell Elements  -  Viscoelasticity  -  Buckling  -  Material Imperfections


Computer-aided structure redesign for improving system dynamics and its application to flexible robot design

Rai, Sudhendu (Massachusetts Inst of Technology); Asada, Haruhiko Source: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Dynamic Systems and Control Division (Publication) DSC, v 33, Control of Systems with Inexact Dynamic Models, 1991, p 149-159

CODEN: ASMDEV ISBN-10: 0-7918-0866-1

Conference: Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Dec 1-6 1991, Atlanta, GA, USA Sponsor: ASME, Dynamic Systems & Control Div

Publisher: Publ by ASME

Abstract: A method for redesigning a mechanical structure to improve dynamic performance of electromechanical systems is presented. The pole-zero locations and other system characteristics are represented in relation to the structure geometry by using a finite element method. The inverse problem to obtain the structure geometry that satisfies desired system characteristics is solved. Given a desired pole-zero plot and characteristics specifications, the CAD system can find the appropriate structure geometry. First, the sensitivities of these system characteristics to changes in the structure geometry are evaluated. The modification of the structure geometry in order to obtain desired characteristics while satisfying constraints is obtained by using the pseudoinverse of the sensitivity matrix, eg. the Jacobian matrix. An efficient method is developed to reduce the large geometric design parameter space by using the singular value decomposition of the Jacobian matrix. A method for evaluating design trade-offs among geometric design parameters and system characteristics and constraints is also developed by using the singular value decomposition. The method is implemented using ADINA as finite element modeller and solver and is applied to the design of a flexible robot arm.

Keywords:  Robots -- Computer Aided Design  -  Dynamics  -  Mathematical Techniques--Finite Element Method  -  Electromechanical Devices  -  Robots--Arms

Secondary  Keywords:  Flexible Robots  -  Jacobian Matrix

 


Shear-fatigue behaviour of steel fiber reinforced concrete beams

Kwak, Kae-Hwan; Suh, June; Hsu, Cheng-Tsu Thomas Source: ACI Structural Journal (American Concrete Institute), v 88, n 2, Mar-Apr, 1991, p 155-160

ISSN: 0889-3241 CODEN: ASTJEG

Abstract: Recently the use of steel fibers has been increased in flexural members and columns of such concrete structures subjected to cyclic loadings as bridge decks, highway roads, runways of airport, and buildings. However, few experimental tests have been carried out under fatigue loading. In the present study, reinforced concrete beams with fiber volume fractions of 1 and 2 percent, with and without stirrups, were investigated. In fatigue tests, it was found that the failure of the beam is usually due to breaking of fibers rather than fiber pullout. A comparison of experiments and numerical analysis using a nonlinear finite element method program (ADINA) is also presented. (6 refs.)

Keywords:  Beams and Girders -- Concrete  -  Steel  -  Concrete Construction--Reinforced Concrete  -  Columns--Concrete  -  Stresses--Shear  -  Fatigue of Materials

Secondary  Keywords:  Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams  -  Nonlinear Finite Element Method Program ADINA  -  Numerical Analysis  -  Bridge Decks  -  Highway Pavements  -  Airport Runways


Simulation of mixed mode fatigue crack growth

Reimers, P. (IWiS GmbH) Source: Computers and Structures, v 40, n 2, Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and ADINA, 1991, p 339-346

ISSN: 0045-7949 CODEN: CMSTCJ

Conference: Proceedings of the 8th ADINA Conference, Jul 17-19 1991, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract: The computation process including ADINA for predicting crackpath and structure lifetime under mixed mode loading is presented. Using the results of a FEM analysis, the J-integral is computed. The separation into JI and JII leads, in the case of linear elastic material behaviour, to the stress intensity factors KI and K II .The crack deflection angle j0 is determined by the criterion of maximum stress in tangential direction. An assumed crack increment, Da, for each computing cycle delivers an estimation for the number of load cycles, DN, using a modified Paris law with a cyclic comparative stress intensity factor DKv. Results for a CTS-specimen made of PMMA are presented and compared with experimental results.

Keywords:  Structural Analysis -- Computer Aided Analysis  -  Fracture Mechanics  -  Buildings--Failure  -  Fatigue of Materials  -  Polymethyl Methacrylates  -  Computer Programming

Secondary  Keywords:  Software Package ADINA  -  PMMA  -  Fatigue Crack Growth  -  Computer Simulation  -  Stress Intensity factors

 



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